Renault Master ZE Electric Van Enters The UK

first_imgSL31 i Z.E. Business Panel van£54,400£10,880£65,280£8,000£46,400£57,280£691£57,971 OptionBasicPriceVATTotal Retail Price Version –Battery Full PurchaseBasicPriceVATTotal Retail PriceGovt GrantBasic Price After PiVGRetail Price After PiVGTotal OTR ChargeOTR After PiVG Press blast:Renault Pro+ commercial vehicles announces pricing and specification of new Renault Master Z.E.Ordering is now open for the New Renault Master Z.E., the all-electric version of the largest Renault Pro+ LCV priced from £45,700 excluding VAT (after the Government PiVG)Ordering is now open for the New Renault Master Z.E., the all-electric version of the largest Renault Pro+ LCV priced from £45,700 excluding VAT (after the Government PiVG).Ideal for emissions-free access to city-centres and benefiting from a payload of up to 1,128kg, New Master Z.E is perfect for last-mile deliveries.Utilising the manufacturer’s electric vehicle expertise – the Renault Kangoo Z.E. 33 and the Renault ZOE being the best-selling electric van and electric car in Europe in 2017 – Master Z.E. combines the new-generation 33 kWh battery and a highly efficient motor to provide a real-world driving range of 74 miles with half payload and a charging time of empty to fully-charged in only six hours.Master Z.E. is available in a choice of three wheelbase configurations – SWB, MWB and LWB – with a choice of two roof heights, LR & MR. All are based on the well-equipped Business specification that is available across the award-winning Renault Master range. Focused on providing drivers with high levels of comfort, convenience, connectivity and safety, standard features of the Business trim level include electric front windows and mirrors, DAB radio, Bluetooth, CD player, USB, full steel bulkhead, ESC, Hill Start Assist and Trailer Swing Assist.Specific equipment that is unique to the New Master Z.E. includes a side Z.E. charging socket, pre-heating function, and Z.E. voice – a specific sound that the vehicle makes at low speeds in order to be more noticeable to pedestrians.Exclusive New Master Z.E. options include a charging cable suitable for a domestic three-pin plug and a three-year renewal subscription to My Z.E Connect, which when combined with the R-Link media system, lets you view the vehicle’s range on a smartphone or computer connected to the internet.The New Master Z.E. is supported by the Renault Pro+ Business Centre network, which has been designed to meet the specific requirements of business customers. Key benefits include sales and after sales advisors specially trained in LCVs, the full Renault LCV range on display, plus a number of converted versions, together with the availability of no-appointment servicing, workshops with extended opening hours and van-for-van courtesy vehicles.The Renault Pro+ Business Centre network is also able to offer customers a wide range of tailor-made converted vehicles based on the New Master Z.E via its accredited convertor programme, which currently lists over 30 convertors who have all met the high standards demanded by the manufacturer. Current conversions include Luton body conversions, refrigerated units and parcel delivery conversions to name a few.Together with the New Renault Master Z.E., the range of electrified Renault Pro+ Commercial Vehicles encompasses the Kangoo Z.E. 33 – available in Panel Van, Maxi, Maxi Crew Van and Maxi Crew Van Cab bodystyles – and the Twizy Cargo quadricycle, which replaces the passenger seat with a 180-litre, 75kg load area.New Renault Master Z.E. – pricing Type 2 Mennekes charging cable 32A (IEC – 629196) 6M£75.00£15.00£90.00 Renault Master Z.E. Electric Truck Now On Sale SM31 i Z.E. Business Panel van£55,000£11,000£66,000£8,000£47,000£58,000£691£58,691 Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 23, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Renault Master Z.E. Technical Specifications:Total GVW: 3.1tPayload of up to 1,128 kgEnergy storage: 33 kWh lithium-ion batteriesOperating range on NDEC cycle: 200 km (124 miles)Real-world operating range: up to 120 km (74.5 miles)57 kW electric motorMaximum torque: 225 NmMaximum speed: 100 km/h (62 mph) It may be too short on range though.The latest electric vehicle from Renault – the Master Z.E. – finally is introduced in the UK where the basic price starts from £53,700 + VAT. After the generous £8,000 Plug-In Car Grant, the final price is £45,700 + VAT or £57,131 (€64,100/$73,000) on the road (OTR).We are not sure whether the real-world range of some 120 km (74.5 miles) will be enough to encourage customers to purchase electric vans at that price. As of the end of October, Renault reported sales of just 31 units.The 33 kWh battery pack and 57 kW electric motor is shared with Renault Kangoo Z.E., and both the battery capacity and motor power sounds low.More about Renault Master Z.E. For further details on the New Renault Master Z.E., and all other Renault LCV variants, visit www.renault.co.uk. ML31 i Z.E. Business Platform Cab£53,700£10,740£64,440£8,000£45,700£56,440£691£57,131center_img LM31 i Z.E. Business Panel van£56,800£11,360£68,160£8,000£48,800£60,160£691£60,851 LL31 i Z.E. Business Platform Cab£54,500£10,900£65,400£8,000£46,500£57,400£691£58,091 New Renault Master Z.E. – exclusive Z.E. options MM31 i Z.E. Business Panel van£56,000£11,200£67,200£8,000£48,000£59,200£691£59,891 Renault Announces Pricing For Master Z.E. In France Source: Electric Vehicle News 19 photos My Z.E. Connect – 3 year renewal subscription£64.00£12.80£76.80 First Renault Master Z.E. In Europe Delivered To PostNL EVSE cable for 10 amp charging using domestic socket£414.00£82.80£496.80last_img read more

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Wrightbus launches fuel cellpowered double decker bus

first_imgSource: Australasian Bus & Coach Northern Ireland-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus showed a production-ready fuel cell-powered double decker bus at the recent Euro Bus Expo in Birmingham, UK.Wrightbus developed the Streetdeck FCEV with funding from the EU-backed Joint Initiative for hydrogen Vehicles across Europe project (JIVE, which some would call a fitting name).The new Streetdeck FCEV bus features a Ballard fuel cell and a Siemens drivetrain. It has a 48 kW traction battery pack, and claims a range of 322 km. Its hydrogen storage tanks weigh just 20 kg, and the battery management system “continuously monitors and balances power stored in each battery cell whilst the vehicle is in service.”The electric drive axle features two 100 kW permanent hub motors, and is designed to allow a flat floor throughout the bus. The bus also features a zero-emission heating system, overnight charging capability and remote diagnostics.Wrightbus says its modular fuel cell bus platform can also be used for a battery-electric variant. Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

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Tesla Model 3 2170 Energy Density Compared To Bolt Model S P100D

first_imgJack Rickard disassembled the Tesla Model 3 battery module and measured the weight of one 2170 cell at 70 grams (@47:50 ref). Finally, we have a weight now all we need is the energy of that cell.We will calculate the energy density based on usable energy.Usable energy densityWe will calculate the cell energy density based on usable energy= usable energy density of the pack divided by the number of cells.As Jack Rickard says, usable energy density is a “squishy” number, and we agree. We’ve had lots of usable energy numbers bandied about. They started out at 78.3 kWh based on a Tesla/EPA test (ref). which went along with a range of 334 miles (ref).Since then, the usable energy numbers have come down. Ingineer hacked into the LR Model 3 computer and found a “full pack energy” value of 76 kWh’s (ref). This 76 kWh number agrees with Jack Rickard’s estimate of a usable energy of the pack equal to 76 kWh and a cell amp hour rating of 4.8 a-hr (@13:33, 47:50 and 51:31 here).However, it seems that in practice Model 3 owners are only getting around 72-74 kWh’s out of their packs. (reference Bjorn Nyland videos for Model 3 LR, 19” sport wheels, 310 mi range, 72 kWh (@16:15ref), LR AWD w/aero wheels, 347 mi range,74 kWh (@ 2:02:21ref) and Performance model 286 mi, 72 kWh (@12:19 ref). The highest number we can find is a from Ben Sullins, who ran a Model 3 LR to shut down and got 75 kWh’s (@4:55ref).TeslaModel 3 / Panasonic 2170 cellWe have usable energy density numbers from 78.3 kWh’s at the high end, down to 72 kWh’s on the low end. We used 76 kWh’s in our calculation based on Ingineer and Jack Rickard. There are 4416 cells in the Model 3 LR pack, so that puts the usable energy density of one 2170 cell at 17.2 watt hours and the energy density equal to 76/4416/.070=246 watt-hours/kgThe Volume of one 2170 cell is .0242 liters (21mmX 70mm cylinder), resulting in a usable energy density by volume of:711 watt-hours/literBoltEVHow do these number stack up against the Chevrolet Bolt EV?According to JeffN over at Electricrevs, the usable energy of the Bolt EV pack is 57 kWh’s (ref). This is the number that is stamped on the inside of the pack by GM. In practice, Bolt EV owners seem to be getting this number, some maybe 58-59 kWh’s (ref). We will use 57 kWh’s in our calculation. There are 288 cells in the Bolt EV pack, so that puts the usable kWh’s of one cell at 198 watt hours.The weight of one Bolt EV cell is an estimate. The closest we have is from a couple of Chinese cell specs for a cell that is supposedly a Bolt EV cell= 820-850 grams (ref).We will use the median number in our calcs= 835grams. Giving the usable energy density of one Bolt EV cell=198/.835=237 watt hours/kgSo, the Bolt EV gravimetric (weight) energy density is less than Tesla’s 2170 by around 4%. Not a bad showing in our opinion. Especially since Bolt EV owners seem to be exceeding GM’s rated pack minimum energy and Tesla Model 3 owners are not. Considering that, we could almost call it a draw on the Bolt EV versus Tesla 2170 energy density by weight.The volume of one Bolt EV cell is also an estimate. We will use dimensions of 270mmX100X 16.5=.446 liters (electricrevs ref). This may be an optimistic number. We can also calculate it from John Kelley’s video. He measured the width, height, and depth of module 1 and 10 in his Bolt EV battery reassembly video (ref@44:00:00) There are 60 cells in those two modules. So, dividing by 60 we get the dimensions of one Bolt EV cell as 16mmX 108X343= .592 liters (vs the .446 liters we used in our calcs). However, the 343mm length number includes a circuit board, so these volume numbers may be a bit high. We would have to subtract some for the circuit board. JeffN says he knows of someone with a disassembled Bolt pack and may provide us with an update on both weight and volume later.That puts the volumetric energy density of one Bolt EV cell at 198 /.446=444 watt-hours/liter.*Quibbling about the correct volume to use for Bolt EV is a bit pointless since it is quite a bit lower than Tesla’s volumetric energy density= 711 watt-hours/liter by 38%.Tesla 18650 P100D cellWe think Jack Rickard used an older 18650 cell in his calcs (Ref@51:31). He stated that the 2170’s energy density was better than the 18650’s.However, our calcs indicate that the P100D 18650 cell has about the same energy density by weight and volume as the new 2170. This implies that all Tesla did with the new 2170 cell was package their best 18650 cell into a larger 2170 cylinder.Here’s our numbers for the Tesla Model S P100D, 18650 cell:Usable pack energy=98.4 kWh’s ( Jason Hughes number from Tesla’s computer), 8256 cells/pack=11.9 watt hours usable.Weight=47.5 grams based on 18650B Panasonic cell spec. Jack quoted 45 grams. In that case, the energy density gets even better.That puts energy density by weight for one Tesla 18650 P100D cell at 11.9/.0475=250 watt-hours/kgAnd volumetric energy density at 11.9/.0165 liters=721 watt-hours/literLike we said, basically the same as the 2170, which further indicates that Tesla just repackaged their best 18650 cell into the 2170 format.Below is the final comparison:    Tesla 2170 cell                    Bolt EV                      P100D 18650Usable energy density, wh/kg            246                                          237                              250Usable energy density wh/liter          711                                         444                              721 Does the Tesla Model 3 really have the highest energy density?Energy density can either be based on weight or volume. In the case of energy density by weight we need to know the energy of one cell (usually in watt-hours) and the weight (usually in kg). Similarly, in the case of volumetric energy density we need to know the energy of the cell and the volume.Related Tesla Model 3 Battery Content: Tesla Model 3 Battery Cell Has World’s Highest Energy Density Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Battery Current Collector: Radically Different Design Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 7, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Battery Secrets Revealed: Videolast_img read more

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Evergrande Health Expected To Report Record Losses Tied To EV Investments

first_imgThe company said the Group’s performance of the health management business is expected to be stable. However, the new energy vehicle sector is predicted to record a net loss of approximately of RMB1.7 billion in 2018 as the Group has accounted for losses in its investment in Smart King Ltd. last year through the equity accounting method, which incurred interest expense in respect of the relevant loans and other expenses.Evergrande Health claimed in last June that it had acquired 100% stake in the Hongkong-based Season Smart Limited with an investment of HK$6.746 billion, which made it obtain 45% stake in Smart King Ltd (the Joint Venture), a joint venture between Season Smart and the EV startup Faraday Future.The transaction actually went through some complex disputes in laws and capitals until FF and Evergrande Health reached a “break-up” agreement on the last day of 2018. On December 31, Evergrande Health announced that Season Smart would no longer be required to make additional investment into the Joint Venture and had also agreed to release all security. Meanwhile, all parties involved had agreed to withdraw and waive all litigations and arbitration proceedings, and all rights to any future claims.Source: Gasgoo Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 13, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News CATL Posts Year-Over-Year Profit Drop BAIC EX3 Electric Car To Launch In April Source: Electric Vehicle News Gotta spend money to eventually make money.Evergrande Health Industry Group Limited (Evergrande Health), a subsidiary of Chinese property giant China Evergrande Group, released a profit warning on March 5 that the company and together with its subsidiaries (the Group) is expected to record net loss of around RMB1.4 billion for the full year of 2018, a sharp contrast with the net profit of RMB300 million gained in 2017.More China News Geely Auto Adds Geely New Energy To Automotive Lineuplast_img read more

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Dallas Jury Awards 109 million to Two Choctaw Nation Charter Bus Crash

first_img Lost your password? Remember me Password A jury ruled Monday that the Choctaw Nation should pay nearly $11 million to the families of two victims who died in a charter bus crash in Irving three years ago while on their way to the Choctaw Casino in Durant, Oklahoma. The verdict is a big win for plaintiff’s lawyer Frank Branson, but defense attorney Tom Fee argues his client will be successful on appeal . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.center_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

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Apple Blossom Opening DayConfluence Health Participating in National Drug Take Back DayChelan

first_imgThe Washington State Apple Blossom Festival begins today. The Memorial Park Food Fair opens at 11am and the first programs on the Gesa Credit Union Entertainment stage begin at noon with Chief For A Day.The heart warming ceremony honors local children with chronic health problems who will be “sworn in” as the “Chief For A Day” of the area’s local law enforcement agencies.The Apple Blossom Festival Official Opening Ceremonies are set for tonight in Memorial Park in a family friendly variety show at 6pm hosted by Grace City Church.Here is a link to the festival website where you will find schedules, event locations and everything you need to enjoy the festival!last_img read more

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Town Toyota Center Presents Dog Days for Dog LoversHigh Speed Pursuit Starts

first_imgTown Toyota Center is going to the dogs with Dog Days on June 29th.  Marketing Director Jennifer Bushong describes the 3rd annual Dog Days as a fun and educational trade show for the whole family. Regional vendors will be on hand for product samples, giveaways and education. Free admission to enter; all activities are $2-$25.  Wenatchee Valley Humane Society will be on-site for animal adoptions.“We will have over 30 vendors there, all giving away free products and promotional items” Bushong said.A press release for the event said leashed and well-behaved four-legged friends are welcome to enter the Town Toyota Center to participate in numerous activities on Saturday, June 29 from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.Bring your well-behaved dog or meet different breeds of dogs provided by the Wenatchee Valley Kennel Club. Performance and participating events from the Wenatchee Kennel Club include;Rally: Rally is a dog sport based on obedience. The owner proceeds around a course of designated stations that consist of signs that instruct the owner and dog what to do.Agility Training: An agility course consists of set of standards obstacles that the dog runs through.Show Handling: Demonstration how to show off your dog’s best characteristics for a dog show.Meet the Breeds: Public invited to meet different breeds of dogs at the Wenatchee Kennel Club booth.Cashmere Veterinarian Clinic will feature an animal pet clinic for children to learn what vets do and have hands-on opportunity to be up-close with a vet.  Dogs are not allowed in this section, but dog handlers will be provided.The Wenatchee Kennel Club will coordinate the PAWGEANT stage activities. Each PAWGEANT activity is free to enter and must register in advance. Guests may pre-register online at towntoyotacenter.com, or day of the event.  The PAWGEANT stage areas are as follows:Beauty Pawgeant-Owners are asked to provide a brief description of your dog. Event will begin at Noon.Mutt Strut-Owners are asked to provide a description of your mutt. Dogs will enter small to tall. Event begins at 12:30 p.m.Trinity Inflatables will showcase their new Henna paws and a photo booth for you and your canine. All areas are ticketed activities are $3-$10 dollars.Two Seattle Caricature artists will be on-site to draw an image of you and your beloved pet. Portraits will be on first-come, first-serve from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. $25 per portrait or two images for $30.All vendors will provide giveaways and/or hands-on learning how to be a better dog owner, handlers, or future veterinarian. There are special gifts from chewy.com and barkbox.com for guests to enter to win and many more surprises. The winners will be announced at the end of the day.For more information or vendor list, visit www.towntoyotacenter.com or call 509.667.7847.Town Toyota Center provided details for this storylast_img read more

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Womens perceptions of male attractiveness do not vary with hormone levels shows

first_imgMay 7 2018Data from almost 600 participants show that women’s perceptions of male attractiveness do not vary according to their hormone levels, in contrast with some previous research. The study findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.”We found no evidence that changes in hormone levels influence the type of men women find attractive,” say lead researcher Benedict C. Jones of the University of Glasgow.”This study is noteworthy for its scale and scope — previous studies typically examined small samples of women using limited measures,” Jones explains. “With much larger sample sizes and direct measures of hormonal status, we weren’t able to replicate effects of hormones on women’s preferences for masculine faces.”To address the limitations of previous studies, Jones and coauthors recruited 584 heterosexual women to participate in a series of weekly test sessions. In each session, the participants reported whether they were currently in a romantic relationship and whether they were currently using hormonal contraceptives. They provided a saliva sample for hormone analyses and completed a task that measured their preferences for different types of male faces.In each face-preference task, the participants saw 10 pairs of male faces and selected the face in each pair that they found more attractive, rating how strong their preference was. The two faces in each pair were digitally altered versions of the same photo – one face was altered to have somewhat feminized features and the other was altered to have somewhat masculinized features. To obscure the specific objective of the study, the researchers interspersed these attractiveness judgments among other filler questions.Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchCould hormone therapy for prostate cancer increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease?Complement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchAs expected, women generally rated the masculinized faces as more attractive than the feminized faces. Preference for the more masculinized faces was also slightly stronger when women judged attractiveness in the context of a short-term relationship as opposed to a long-term relationship.However, there was no evidence that women’s preferences varied according to levels of fertility-related hormones, such as estradiol and progesterone. There was also no association between attractiveness judgments and levels of other potentially influential hormones, such as testosterone and cortisol.These findings run counter to the hypothesis that sexual selection pressures lead women to prefer more masculine mates, who supposedly have greater genetic “fitness,” when they are most fertile and most likely to conceive.The data also showed that oral contraceptive use did not dampen women’s preference for masculine faces, as has been shown previously.”There has been increasing concern that the birth control pill might disrupt romantic relationships by altering women’s mate preferences, but our findings do not provide evidence of this,” says Jones.In light of these findings, Jones and coauthors are continuing to investigate whether other fertility-related differences hold up in larger, more robust studies. Source:https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/womens-preference-for-masculine-faces-not-linked-with-hormones.htmllast_img read more

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Depression symptoms can get worse without proper treatment

first_imgThe warning signs of depression should never be ignored. Anyone with these symptoms should speak with their primary care provider or a behavior health specialist. Loved ones or friends who exhibit these symptoms should be encouraged to do the same.”If we feel physically ill we get medical treatment without giving it a second thought,” added Dr. Golinkoff. “We should think of mental illness in much the same way.” May 31 2018While it is common for everyone to feel down or sad at times, a person whose symptoms last for more than two weeks may be having a major depressive episode, according to The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA). An estimated 16.2 million adults in the United States had at least one major depressive episode in 2016, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.The treatments for depression can vary and include medications, psychotherapy or a combination of the two. “Often the most difficult cases of depression can be effectively treated,” said Michael Golinkoff, Ph.D., M.B.A., president of PerformCare, a managed behavioral health organization and part of the AmeriHealth Caritas Family of Companies. “However, the sooner the treatment can begin, the better it will work.”Related StoriesTeens who can describe negative emotions are better protected against depressionScientists describe microbiome composition in patients suffering from IBD and PSCNew structured approach to managing patients with depression in primary careSomeone may be experiencing depression and not realize they have it, as the symptoms vary. About 37 percent of adults with a major depressive episode did not receive treatment. It’s also important to point out that without proper treatment, the symptoms can get worse.According to SAMSHA, some of the warning signs of depression include Sadness, anxiety, or feeling “empty” Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism, guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness Fatigue or decreased energy level Change in appetite At the extreme, thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts.center_img Source:https://www.samhsa.gov/last_img read more

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Fracture risk increases by 30 after gastric bypass study shows

first_img Source:https://www.gu.se/english Aug 13 2018A study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research shows that the risk of fractures increases by about 30 percent after a gastric bypass operation. It was also discovered that falls increase after these operations.”Gastric bypass is a well-established method that has proven effective in reducing obesity, diabetes and mortality, so naturally our findings do not mean that you should stop providing these types of operations,” says Mattias Lorentzon, professor of geriatrics at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and Chief Physician at the University Hospital.The study is based on the records of 38,971 patients who underwent gastric bypass operations, of which 7,758 had diabetes and 31,213 did not. Those who had had the operation were compared with an equally large group of individuals who had not been operated on and who had the equivalent morbidity and background data.Related StoriesMothers with gestational diabetes transferring harmful ‘forever chemicals’ to their fetusDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesMetabolic enzyme tied to obesity and fatty liver diseaseFalls can contributeRegardless of diabetes status, those who had been operated on had about a 30 percent increased risk of fractures. Individuals without diabetes had an increased risk of 32 percent and those with diabetes had an increased risk of 26 percent. The risk increase applies to fractures in general, with the exception of the lower leg. After surgery, fractures of the lower legs occurred less frequently.The results correspond well with earlier research in the field, but the current study is statistically stronger due to its size. The data is also more equivalent since the researchers focused on the dominant method of obesity surgery, gastric bypass, and exclude other forms.With gastric bypass operations, most of the stomach and part of the small intestine are removed. Food goes directly into the small intestine instead of passing through the entire stomach, which increases the sense of being full. The person eats less and nutrient uptake decreases leading to weight loss.Important to evaluate risksThe most common hypothesis of the mechanism behind increased fracture after obesity surgery has been weight loss and that the skeleton becomes weaker with the less load. The study did not show a relationship between the fracture rate and the degree of weight loss. An increased risk of falls after surgery, however, was noted, which in itself could contribute to increased risk of fractures. The question of why individuals who have had operations fall more often, with or without fractures as a consequence, has no clear answer yet.”The fact that the risk of fractures increases and also seems to increase over time means that it will be important to follow patients, evaluate the fracture risk and, when required, institute measures to prevent fractures,” says Kristian Axelsson, doctoral student at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and resident physician in orthopedics at Skaraborg Hospital Skövde.last_img read more

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Shrinking Waves May Save Antarctic Sea Ice

It’s a nagging thorn in the side of climatologists: Even though the world is warming, the average area of the sea ice around Antarctica is increasing. Climate models haven’t explained this seeming contradiction to anyone’s satisfaction—and climate change deniers tout that failure early and often. But a new paper suggests a possible explanation: Variability in the heights of ocean waves pounding into the sea ice may help control its advance and retreat.The sea ice growth around Antarctica isn’t particularly large—about 1.2% to 1.8% on average per decade between 1979 and 2012, according to the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report. It’s also not uniform. The increases are concentrated primarily in the Ross Sea in western Antarctica; meanwhile, in the nearby Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas, sea ice has significantly decreased just as it has done in the Arctic.What role waves play in all this has been barely examined, from a climate modeling standpoint. Ocean waves undeniably pound into the ice, of course—polar explorer Ernest Shackleton noted “swells coming in and breaking the ice up” in his book South, says Alison Kohout, of the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in Christchurch, New Zealand. But how does a single wave interact with an ice floe? And what is the cumulative effect of pounding waves on hundreds of kilometers of ice? To begin to answer these questions, Kohout and her colleagues focused on the marginal ice zone (MIZ), the transitional region at the edge of the sea ice pack where the swell of ocean waves can still significantly affect the shape and size of the floes. The MIZ, which is packed with smallish floes—perhaps 100 meters across at most—receives the brunt of the pounding from large waves churned up by powerful storms in the open ocean. As the ocean waves scatter their energy into the floes, the floes may collide and bend or break, forming smaller floes or a slurry of ice on the water. Modeling how a single wave affects this region is tricky: In some ways, the sea ice behaves as individual floes, while in other ways it acts as a very thick fluid that “dampens” the wave’s energy.To measure how far into the ice the waves still pack a punch, the researchers used wave height, energy, and frequency data gathered from five autonomous wave sensors positioned on Antarctic sea ice along a 250-kilometer line. They noticed an interesting thing. As predicted, small waves—less than 3 meters tall—lost energy rapidly as they propagated through the sea ice, as they would through a thick fluid. But larger waves didn’t lose their energy nearly as quickly. As a result, “when the waves are bigger, the ice is going to get munched up a lot quicker,” Kohout says. Storms kicking up large waves, therefore, would have a disproportionately powerful effect on sea ice breakup, they report online today in Nature. And conversely, if wave heights are decreasing in a particular region, that could “allow” the sea ice to expand, she says.Next, the team compared satellite sea ice observations from 1997 to 2009 with modeled wave heights during that time. The correlation was strong: When waves got shorter in a given area—such as the Ross Sea—sea ice grew. When waves got taller, the ice retreated. “It was really quite exciting,” Kohout says. “This … really shows that it’s quite possible [wave heights] are playing an important role.”Indeed, the lines “agree beautifully”, says climate modeler Paul Holland of the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, U.K., who was not involved in the study. But that doesn’t prove that wave heights control the expansion and retreat of the sea ice, as the paper suggests, Holland says. Maybe changes in ice cover affect the size of the waves. Or maybe some third effect causes changes in both wave height and ice cover. “I would suggest that the change in ice cover is due to changes in the winds,” Holland says. He co-authored a 2012 paper in Nature Geoscience that suggested that more northward-blowing winds around Antarctica are pushing the ice northward, increasing sea ice cover and also damping down waves. “That explanation is also entirely consistent” with the paper’s correlation between sea ice extent and wave heights. Still, “it’s not a closed case,” he adds.Incorporating a hyper-regional effect such as how wave heights influence sea ice into global climate models is going to be tricky, says Sam Dean, also of New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, in Wellington, and a co-author on the new study. “If it was easy, they would have done it. [But] this paper suggests that it might be worthwhile,” he says. Kohout says that’s the message she hopes to deliver: That wave heights should at least be considered in future climate models, “to show that it is or isn’t important, one way or the other.” Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country read more

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France finally fills top science policy post

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country France’s socialist government has finally found someone to run its science and higher education policy. Yesterday, President François Hollande appointed Thierry Mandon as the new state secretary for higher education and research, a post that became vacant when Geneviève Fioraso stepped down in March for health reasons. The 3-month delay had sparked discontent among scientists, who said it betrayed a fundamental lack of interest in research. In April, trade unions called the empty seat “unacceptable.”Mandon, a political scientist by training, knows the world of research well. Between 1998 and 2014, he was president of Genopole, a biotechnology and genomics research cluster near Paris. “During these 16 years, Thierry Mandon has demonstrated a deep commitment to research and innovation. He also knows [the world of] higher education vey well,” Genopole Director-General Pierre Tambourin said yesterday. Mandon was elected to the National Assembly for the second time in 2012—he was a member before his stint at Genopole as well—where he got involved in higher education and student issues. Since June 2014, he has been state secretary for state reform and simplification, a job in which he was responsible for making French public authorities more efficient and user-friendly. Emailcenter_img Mandon faces many demands. Trade unions want the government to make a new body for the evaluation of higher education and research fully operational, and they want a dialog about researchers’ working conditions, including the situation of researchers and technicians on short-term contracts, the career progression of permanent staff, the place of women in research, and professional burnout. There has been a wave of protest in the past year in defense of permanent scientific employment and stable funding for universities and research centers. The recent €100 million cut in government funding for universities has fueled anxiety about the 2016 budget, currently under negotiation.During his investiture yesterday, Mandon acknowledged the current “difficulties faced by the students, the researchers, some universities, [and] some centers,” though he didn’t give any specifics. New policies should target the daily life of students and researchers and include the promotion of quality at the individual and national levels, he said.Researchers will judge Mandon first and foremost on his ability to stave off further cuts, says Guillaume Bossis, a biologist at the National Center for Scientific Research who is a spokesperson for Sciences en Marche, the group behind last year’s protests. “However, we fear that he will not have enough political power within the government to really change [the] situation,” Bossis writes in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. “We also hope that he will lend a more attentive ear to the academic world and its needs than his predecessor.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Feature Conjuring chemical cornucopias out of thin air

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A fill-up at the gas station may seem expensive, but fuels are relatively cheap commodities. So would-be makers of solar fuels are looking for ways to apply their technology to making more valuable materials.Last month, for example, Stuart Licht, a chemist at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and colleagues reported in Nano Letters that they had developed a version of their solar reactor technology (see main story) that can take CO2 out of the air and convert it into solid carbon nanofibers. The researchers found that when they added trace amounts of either nickel, copper, cobalt, or iron to their electrolysis cell, the metals form tiny islands on the cathode that then serve as landing sites for thousands of split-off carbon atoms to insert themselves and quickly grow into long, thin fibers. Licht’s team had previously shown they could turn CO2 into a solid carbon material called amorphous carbon, which is worth some $1000 per metric ton. But carbon nanofibers could be worth far more, perhaps as much as $25,000 per metric ton, because they are widely used in making lightweight, high-strength composites for applications such as car bumpers and airplane parts. “We are making a valuable commodity that we hope will produce a driving force for using this technology,” Licht says.Others are pursuing the same strategy. A small New Jersey–based company called Liquid Light is working to commercialize technology for converting CO2 into ethylene glycol, a commodity chemical with a $27 billion annual market. Another company, Skyonic, recently opened a demonstration plant in Texas that turns CO2 into baking soda, hydrochloric acid, and bleach.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Such commodities aren’t manufactured on a scale anywhere near that of gasoline and other transportation fuels. So making them with CO2 siphoned off a smokestack or pulled from the air isn’t likely to make a sizable impact on global atmospheric CO2 levels, says Matthew Kanan, a chemist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who is working to convert CO2 into plastics and other higher value commodities. However, he says, “Perhaps we can use that as a stepping stone.” With time and experience, companies may then find way to improve their processes, lower their costs, and begin to make high-volume, low-cost compounds such as fuels. “I’m a technology optimist,” Kanan says.last_img read more

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This rare footage of jaguar cubs is inspiring hope for Brazils endangered

first_img By Herton EscobarApr. 12, 2017 , 9:00 AM Footage from hidden cameras in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest is inspiring new hope for the region’s critically endangered jaguar (Panthera onca). Fewer than 300 of these great cats remain in the forest, where they are confined to small patches of jungle surrounded by cities and farmland. So it was “the most beautiful thing in the world,” when Beatriz Beisiegel captured rare footage of a healthy female jaguar followed by her two cubs in December 2016 in Carlos Botelho State Park. The trio passed the camera trap not once, but at least three times, the last with full bellies. This is the first time that Beisiegel, a biologist with the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation in Brasília, has seen a cub in her 12 years monitoring jaguars in the dense jungles of the Ribeira Valley, in southern São Paulo state. The sighting is especially encouraging, given the constant threat of poaching in these encroached forests. Just last month, another jaguar was illegally shot and killed on nearby private lands by hunters who bragged about the deed in a viral internet video. Beisiegel says she hopes her videos will inspire others to protect jaguars and reject a bill currently moving through the Brazilian Congress that would legalize the sport hunting of wild animals. Appropriately enough, she has given an apt name to the female jaguar: Hope. This rare footage of jaguar cubs is inspiring hope for Brazil’s endangered catlast_img read more

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Why some baby bees are destined to become workers—or queens

first_img By Giorgia GuglielmiAug. 31, 2017 , 2:13 PM Why some baby bees are destined to become workers—or queens The saying “you are what you eat” is particularly true for female honey bees, which grow up to be either small, sterile workers or large, fertile queens depending on their diet. Previously, many researchers thought that something in the food fed to young queens—a secretion called royal jelly—was what made the difference. Now, a new study suggests it’s signaling molecules in the grub of young worker bees that keeps their sexual development in check. That diet, a mixture of pollen and honey called “beebread,” is shot through with a special kind of microRNA (miRNA), noncoding RNA molecules that help regulate gene expression. To find out whether these miRNAs were the culprit, scientists added them to the diet of larvae raised in the lab. These larvae developed more slowly, with smaller bodies and smaller ovaries than larvae fed food without the supplement, the team reports today in PLOS Genetics. The researchers also found that one common, plant-derived miRNA in beebread switches off a gene that helps larvae turn into queens. After being eaten with food, the miRNAs might enter the bee’s gut and spread throughout the rest of the body, where they could help regulate key genes, the scientists say. Although plant miRNAs alone aren’t likely to turn queens into workers, queens-to-be probably don’t want to eat the commoners’ bread.last_img read more

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Neanderthals used their hands like tailors and painters

first_imgNeanderthals used their hands like tailors and painters Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Meagan CantwellSep. 26, 2018 , 2:00 PMcenter_img In the future, these 3D scans could provide insight into the hand-grip of other early humans, as well as how they used other muscles while alive. Despite their brutish reputation, Neanderthals used their hands more like tailors than construction workers, new research suggests.To make the find, researchers looked at entheses, scars on a bone where muscle attaches that can give a sense of how someone used their muscles over their lifetime. The team built on a previous study that took 3D scans of the hands of bricklayers, butchers, tailors, and painters. The brute-force laborers tended to have more prominent entheses on the thumb and pinky, whereas those with more fine-movement jobs tended to have larger entheses on the thumb and index finger.The scientists then performed similar scans on the hand bones of 12 ancient individuals: six Neanderthals and six modern humans who lived more than 40,000 years ago. All of the Neanderthal specimens showed signs of precision gripping, the researchers report today in Science Advances. In contrast, only half of the early humans appeared to be habitual precision grippers; the rest apparently spent more time using a brute-force power grip. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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Did judgmental gods help societies grow

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Sistine Chapel (Cappella Sistina) by Michelangelo Buonarroti, 16th century, fresco (post restoration), Buonarroti, Michelangelo (1475-1564)/Musei e Gallerie Pontificie, Musei Vaticani, Vatican City/Mondadori Portfolio/Bridgeman Images By Lizzie WadeMar. 20, 2019 , 2:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Did judgmental gods help societies grow? Today’s most popular religions have one thing in common: gods or supernatural laws (such as karma) that dictate moral behavior and punish transgressions. Act morally and these supernatural forces will reward you; break the rules and you’ll be punished.But moralizing gods seem to be quite rare in human history. Researchers know from ethnographies that the gods of hunter-gatherer societies, for example, don’t much concern themselves with humans, much less their moral behavior. (Many of them focus on nature instead.) Now, a new study tests a popular hypothesis about why moralizing gods eventually took over.Many scholars argue that moralizing gods were needed to build large-scale societies, an idea sometimes known as the “big gods” hypothesis, although it applies to impersonal supernatural moral laws like karma as well. Hunter-gatherers live in small bands in which everybody knows everybody else, so immoral behavior is virtually guaranteed to be discovered and punished. But in larger, more anonymous societies—from networks of interconnected villages to the first cities—people can break the rules without anyone noticing. If everyone did that, society would fall apart, so moralizing gods were needed to keep an eye on everyone and encourage cooperation instead of cheating. The more people cooperate, the more the society can grow. To test this idea, a team of researchers used a new historical database called Seshat (named for the ancient Egyptian goddess of wisdom). Seshat contains information about the sizes, governments, militaries, religions, economies, and more of hundreds of societies spanning the past 10,000 years, making it possible for researchers to quantitatively compare them.The scientists analyzed 414 societies from 30 regions around the world, from the deep past until the Industrial Revolution. They classified each society according to 51 measures of social complexity, such as how many people belonged to it and whether its government had hierarchical leadership. They also attempted to determine whether each society believed in a moralizing god (or gods) or a supernatural law that enforced values such as fairness and loyalty. It’s “very ambitious,” says Carol Ember, a cross-cultural anthropologist at Yale University, who wasn’t involved in the new research.Large-scale societies did tend to have moralizing gods, whereas small-scale societies didn’t, the team reports today in Nature. But when the researchers zeroed in on the 12 regions for which they could examine societies before and after the emergence of moralizing gods, they found that moralizing gods consistently appeared after a society had already grown large and complex.That means these deities couldn’t have helped a society with its initial growth spurt, says Patrick Savage, an anthropologist and ethnomusicologist at Keio University in Fujisawa, Japan, and an author of the new study. He suggests participating in religious rituals—which do tend to appear as social complexity is increasing—may be more important than belief in moralizing gods for first promoting cooperation. Once societies reach 1 million members or so, he says, moralizing gods seem to come in to stabilize cooperation between people who may have different languages, ethnicities, or cultural backgrounds.That’s “an interesting alternative hypothesis” that deserves to be investigated, says Edward Slingerland, a historian at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, who helped develop the “big gods” hypothesis. But he worries about the reliability of Seshat’s data, because the majority of them were collected and classified by research assistants and not expert historians.“People are really going to be scrutinizing the data,” and rightfully so, adds Quentin Atkinson, an evolutionary psychologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand who wasn’t involved in the new research. He points out, for example, that written or archaeological evidence for moralizing gods likely appeared well after belief in them begins, a lag that can skew the timing of their emergence in a database such as Seshat. “A lot rests on the quality of that information.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

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Most snail shells coil to the right This single gene may be

first_img If you ever come across a group of snails, chances are most of their shells coil to the right. Until recently, scientists didn’t know why this was the case. Now, researchers have found the gene that makes this right-coiling happen in freshwater snails (Lymnaea stagnalis).For the first time, scientists used CRISPR, a tool that edits genes, successfully in snails. They mutated a gene called Lsdia1, which had been suggested in previous studies to be involved in shell coiling. Gastropods without a functional version of the gene produced offspring with shells that coiled to the left (pictured), researchers report today in the journal Development. These changes in shell coiling could be seen as early as the embryo stage.It’s still not clear how Lsdia1 controls shell coiling all by itself. Scientists think it may encode a special protein that is involved in regulating cells’ internal skeleton, but more tests still need to be done. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Most snail shells coil to the right. This single gene may be the reason why Hiromi Takahashi By Helen SantoroMay. 14, 2019 , 7:00 AM Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Genes like Lsdia1 are found throughout the animal kingdom, meaning similar mechanisms may be influencing left-right asymmetry in other species, scientists note.last_img read more

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Kerala Karunya Lottery KR403 Results Today winners announced first prize Rs 80

first_imgIf the prize money is less than Rs 5,000, the winners can claim the money from any lottery shop in Kerala. If the amount won is above Rs 5,000, the winners will have to surrender their tickets before a bank or government lottery office with id proofs.Kerala Karunya Lottery KR-403 Results Today: Check hereThe live results would be announced at 3 pm. Official results will be available from 4 pm onwards on http://www.keralalotteries.com/. The price of a single ticket is Rs 30, while the entire book costs Rs 750.With seven daily and multiple bumper draws, the lottery is one of the biggest cash flows in Kerala. Top News LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? The state government organises four festival bumper draws — Onam, Vishu, Christmas and Pooja/Dussehra.There are two seasonal jackpots, the monsoon and summer bumper. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Kerala Karunya Lottery KR-403 Results Today: With seven daily and multiple bumper draws, the lottery is one of the biggest cash flows in Kerala. (File) KeralaKerala Karunya Lottery KR-403 Results Today: The Kerala state lottery department today will announce the results of Kerala Karunya Lottery KR-403. The first prize is worth Rs 80 lakh, while the second and third are of Rs 10 lakh and Rs 1 lakh respectively. The consolation prize is Rs 8,000. Advertising Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 6, 2019 3:38:11 pm Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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