2015 CIOs: Need to Be in the Digital Driving Seat – Not a Passenger

first_img2014 was another challenging year for the CIO with plenty of column inches given over to debating the control and usage of technology across the enterprise with much speculation about the validity of the role itself.Personally, I think talk of the demise of the CIO role is presumptuous though what is critical right now is that the CIO role needs to evolve with 2015 being the time to flourish and show their true worth in helping set the strategic direction of their organisation.  The CIO role is like no other in that it allows visibility across the organisation that others rarely get to achieve and those that are commercially astute with a capacity to add tangible value to the business will excel – those who are not will likely be sitting in a different chair at the start of 2016.As a result of the recent economic turmoil and rapidity of change across the commercial landscape, many organisations are now looking for a different type of CIO or technology leader than they have in the past. They are diluting the need for a more technically focused individual to one who is able to unravel the complexity of IT, increase the accessibility to technology, and be open to new ideas with the ability to work with peers on getting the right things done.  One of the key factors in this evolutionary change in the CIO role is the need to understand and appreciate they no longer have ultimate say over what technologies are used within their organisation but they will still be held accountable for making sure it all works.Gartner research has shown that 38% of IT spend is already outside of IT and that they expect this to reach 50% by 2017.  This is going to send a shiver down the spine of many a CIO but they must understand the diversification of technology usage and need across their organisation.  This is quite the culture shift for many who have migrated in to the CIO role from the traditional ‘lights on’ IT director role of old but this will make absolute sense for those who have the ability to evolve in to this new model which will free them up to get more involved in defining and executing the ‘big picture’ strategy.  Too long the CIO has been identified as the strategic and commercial weak link in the c-suite and not adding tangible value across the business – they must seize this opportunity to transform their role and reputation in to one that thinks collectively, understanding how best to resolve the issues that matter across the business and ultimately delivering commercial value.The main theme and focus for many of us this year is how to transformand drive a digital business.  Naturally this is a hot topic for CIO’s and the challenge of how to implement and transform your business to a digital operating model is now top billing on the agendas of many boardrooms across the globe.  This is exactly where the CIO can step up and work with peers and key stakeholders across the business to define a strategy which is moulded around a ‘customer first’ approach where digital technologies will form the cornerstones of how your services are delivered and consumed going forward.  This will require much managing of change, process, and incumbent technology and possibly need a marked change in strategic direction – a role tailor-made for the commercially astute CIO in harness with the CMO.The impact of digital business on industries and individual organisations cannot be underestimated and Gartner have predicted that by 2017 one in five industry leaders will have ceded their market dominance to a company founded after 2000.  This is a bold claim but one which I support as no longer can you rely on historical dominance of your sector – either embrace disruption now or start planning your burial in the corporate graveyard alongside luminaries such as Kodak and Blockbusters.CIO’s must embrace a “Bi-Modal IT” mind-set where they simultaneously embark on the digital transformation journey whilst maintaining Business as Usual (BAU) services.It’s no secret that the most successful CIO’s are those who are able to run the business and transform it at the same time. Many industry observers and consultants will tell you that they have witnessed more transformation in the last 3 years than in the previous 20 years combined, so this shows how important these skills are in the modern CIO.  I don’t see any lessening in this pace as the demand for new and simpler ways to consume data, information, products and solutions is only going to increase year on year as the technology and accessibility to it improves.CIO’s will also need to start concentrating on what talent they need to bring in to their organisations this year to manage this “Bi-Modal IT” approach as the market for the best talent is already stretched and growing ever more taut.  CIO’s should help their business colleagues and the CEO think outside the box to imagine new scenarios for digital business that cross companies and industries, providing a great opportunity for CIO’s to amplify their role in the organisation.Gone are the days where you can supply rigid corporate systems, which are only accessible on site – the corporate world has evolved and everyone wants to consume technology in different ways with previously inaccessible data being lusted after to analyse for new operational and commercial insights.CIO’s need to help create the right mind-set and a shared understanding among key decision makers in the enterprise – to help them “get” the possibilities of digital business.They must take a leadership role in helping their organisations change their mind-set to what’s possible – and what’s inevitable in a digital business future.This should not be done in isolation or be detrimental to any key relationships such as that with the CMO as it’s imperative you work together and deliver the ‘right’ digital strategy for your organisation.Get yourself in the digital driving seat and don’t become a passenger.  It’s going to be a busy year with a fair amount of turbulence, so buckle up and enjoy the ride.‌last_img read more

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Nick Kyrgios fined, apologises for comment to Stan Wawrinka

first_imgAustralian Nick Kyrgios has been fined $10,000 and may face further punishment for the insulting comment he directed at Swiss Stan Wawrinka during a match at the Rogers Cup, the ATP said on Thursday.Kyrgios took to Twitter and Facebook to apologise for the incident but it did not stop the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) from issuing the maximum fine allowed for such an offence.And the matter may not be done, as the ATP has not ruled out further action against Kyrgios.”Nick Kyrgios has been fined the maximum on site amount of $10,000 for an insulting comment he made to Stan Wawrinka,” an ATP said in a statement.”The ATP … is still reviewing that matter and additional penalties may be forthcoming.”Just a couple of hours after the ATP announced it would fine Kyrgios the 20-year-old player went into damage control mode.”I would like to take this opportunity to apologise for the comments I made during the match last night vs Stan… http://t.co/WfFUnSQjYx Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios) August 13, 2015He also posted the comment on Facebook, adding: “My comments were made in the heat of the moment and were unacceptable on many levels.Aslo read: Kyrgios courts more controversy after sledging Wawrinka “In addition to the private apology I’ve made, I would like to make a public apology as well. I take full responsibility for my actions and regret what happened.”The ATP took the action against Kyrgios for a comment picked up by a courtside microphone.advertisement”Kokkinakis banged your girlfriend,” Kyrgios said, referring to his Davis Cup team mate Thanasi Kokkinakis. “Sorry to tell you that, mate.”French Open champion Wawrinka, who separated from his wife last year, has been linked with Croatian WTA Tour player Donna Vekic, as has Kokkinakis.Also read: Andy Murray and Rafael Nadal win but other seeds tumble in Montreal Wawrinka did not appear to hear the comment at the time, but he was furious afterwards, calling at his official press conference and via Twitter for the ATP to take disciplinary action against Kyrgios.”What was said I wouldn’t say to my worst enemy. To stop so low is not only unacceptable but also beyond belief,” he tweeted.Kyrgios said after he had won the second-round match 6-7(8) 6-3 4-0, following Wawrinka’s retirement due to a back injury, that he had been responding to words from the two-time grand slam champion.”He was getting a bit lippy with me,” Kyrgios said of Wawrinka. “Kind of in the heat of the moment. I don’t know. I just said it.”last_img read more

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Cricket: India’s participation for Asia Cup 2020 cast with major doubt as Pakistan set…

first_imgAdvertisement Image Courtesy: People MagazineAdvertisementSevere political tensions between the neighbouring countries have had a major impact on all issues including sports. With Pakistan assigned to host the next edition of Asia Cup in 2020, India’s participation for the same remains doubtful. Image Courtesy: People MagazineIn a decision taken by the ACC (Asian Cricket Council), during the recent meeting held in Singapore, the hosting rights for Asia Cup 2020 were awarded to Pakistan who last hosted the tournament in 2008.The tournament will be played in the T20 format considering the T20 World Cup which would be held in Australia shortly after the culmination of the tournament in Pakistan.Asia Cup, which was once held only in the 50 over format, changed its policy by switching with T20’s in an alternate fashion. The last two editions have been won by India where they defeated Bangladesh.Despite reaching a conclusion in regards to the venue for the tournament, various media outlets report that the ACC would change the location if the ties between the two countries do not improve.Read Also:ICC CWC 2019: Indian bowling attack assess the performance ahead of the first clashICC CWC 2019: KL Rahul reflects back on his warm-up heroicslast_img read more

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Champions League: Tottenham pulled off mission impossible, says Pochettino

first_img “No-one believed in us,” Pochettino said. “People said it was mission impossible, but we are here. It is a massive achievement for the club.” Ousmane Dembele’s superb early goal looked set to put Tottenham out, as Son Heung-min, Harry Kane and Moura all missed excellent chances. Moura’s late strike, however, set up a dramatic finale, with Spurs players left to wait after the final whistle for the finish to be confirmed in Italy. Victory, and progress to the knock-out stages, represents an impressive achievement for Tottenham, particularly given they have had to play home games at Wembley this term while their new stadium continues to be delayed. “It is great for the club,” Pochettino said. “It gives us the possibility to play Champions League in our new stadium, which will be a massive boost for the club.” Catch up on all the latest sports news and updates here. Also download the new mid-day Android and iOS apps to get latest updates This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever Harry Kane: Tottenham must carry this form into EPL Tottenham Hotspur sack head coach Mauricio Pochettino Mauricio Pochettino revelled in Tottenham defying what he said many had dubbed mission impossible on Tuesday as they drew away to Barcelona and qualified for the Champions League’s Last 16. Spurs needed to match Inter Milan’s result at home to PSV Eindhoven, which they did, thanks to Lucas Moura’s 85th-minute equaliser snatching a 1-1 draw at the Camp Nou. Inter were held to the same scoreline by PSV, sending Pochettino’s side through in second place in Group B, despite them taking just a single point from their opening three games.Related News Tottenham Hotspur appoint Jose Mourinho as managerlast_img read more

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It’s unbelievable: Aaron Finch revels in historic ODI series vs India

first_imgAustralia captain Aaron Finch was over the moon after Australia registered their first one-day international series win since January 17 as they beat Virat Kohli’s men in India 3-2 in the five-match ODI series on Wednesday. Australia were trailing 0-2 in the series after the first two ODIs but fought back remarkably to clinch the series.Finch said it was incredible the way the Australia cricket team fought back and that he was very proud of the group for coming back in the series the way they did.”It’s unbelievable. The resilience and the fight that we showed was incredible. We’ve had our backs against the wall for a while now, but I’m really proud of the group for coming back,” Finch said at the post-match presentation ceremony.INDIA VS AUSTRALIA 5TH ODI: REPORT | HIGHLIGHTSFinch said that Australia had a balanced side and backed this team to win the 2019 ICC World Cup in England and Wales. He was happy with the performances in the series despite the early losses.”It’s important to have a balanced side. We need a good balance of attack and defence. You need good batsmanship on these wickets against these really talented guys like Kuldeep, Chahal and Jaddu.”Like I said, people have written us off for quite a while now, but the team that we have can win us the series, and they can win us the World Cup. It was a great series all round even though India beat us resoundingly in Nagpur,” Finch further said.advertisementUsman Khawaja, who was named the man-of-the-match and the man-of-the-series for his two hundreds and a total of 383 runs in the series overall. Khawaja was very excited about his performance and the series win.”It’s a lot of fun scoring hundreds and even more fun winning games. Very good to come back from 0-2 down, and never easy to beat India at home. Very excited,” Khawaja said at the presentation ceremony.Khawaja lauded the entire team for their collective effort that led to Australia beating India in India and revealed that even after the losses in the first two games, the atmosphere in the dressing room was great.”I just played depending on the conditions. Our spinners, and our batters adapted really well and at the end of the day, it was a really good team performance. That good partnership in the third game, Finch batted beautifully, there have been tough wickets and high-scoring ones.”The batters chipped in, the bowling group chipped in, and credit to all the support staff because the atmosphere was really great even after we lost the first two games. We had a lot of fun. Even when we lost the first two games, we had a good vibe in the dressing room.”Also Read | Usman Khawaja in Kohli, de Villiers league after Delhi ODI hundredAlso Read | Rohit Sharma third fastest to reach 8000 runs in ODIsAlso Read | Virat Kohli amused after Ravindra Jadeja’s theatrical appeal in Delhi ODIlast_img read more

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Bill Snyder Shares Handwritten Message to Ben Grogan

first_imgLess than a week after the Ice Pirate put away a wild contest to give Oklahoma State a victory over his team, Bill Snyder shared a personal note with Grogan himself.Here’s the tweet:I have so much respect for Coach Synder and the Kansas State Football program, so cool for him to do this! pic.twitter.com/E6rhnoMHro— Ben Grogan (@Ben__Grogan) October 9, 2015“Congratulations Ben. I admire the courage you displayed in hitting the game winning FG. That took great focus and discipline on your part. Wishing you contined success.”-Coach SnyderSnyder is a class act all the way around. If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Koscielny an important player for Arsenal – Emery

first_imgArsenal head coach Unai Emery insists Laurent Koscielny is still “an important player” despite the uncertainty over the club captain’s future.Koscielny refused to travel to the United States for Arsenal’s pre-season tour amid speculation over his future, with Lyon, Bordeaux and Borussia Dortmund linked with a move for the French defender.Emery says the 33-year-old is still part of his plans, but admits a decision on what happens with Koscielny from this point is now in the club’s hands. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? “He has one year left on his contract.” Emery said after Arsenal’s 3-0 win over Colorado Rapids on Monday“For me as a coach he’s an important player.“Now it’s one matter for him and the club. The club and him need to speak, they are speaking about his situation. I cannot say more than that.“I spoke with him before he came here and he decided to stay there.”Emery claims to have spoken with Koscielny multiple times about his situation before the centre-back opted against travelling.The Spanish coach added: “He started training with us this pre-season and I spoke with him three times for his situation.“We wanted him to come with us on this tour but he decided to stay. Now it is a matter for the club and for the player.”Laurent Koscielny Arsenal 2018-19While Koscielny retains the support of his manager for now, it has been suggested that a man who has spent nine years in north London is in danger of tarnishing his legacy.Arsenal legend Ian Wright told his personal YouTube channel of an unfortunate saga: “He’s given us unbelievable service, we’ve seen him play through pain and build a legacy and legendary status he deserves.”It’s the time in the season where everybody is meant to be together. We are in for a tough season, a transitional period, we need a lot of catching up.”For our captain to refuse to go on a pre-season tour after nine years of unbelievable service, to destroy your legacy a little by refusing to play for a club is something that is baffling me.”Why Laurent? Who are your advisers and what are they saying to you?”I am so disappointed in your decision to do this at this time, if your agent sees this, and I hope they do, shame on you, shame on you, for doing this to him and convincing him. No way you can tell me he will come up with this on his own.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

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Upgrading Works at Correctional Facilities

first_imgThe Government has budgeted $168 million in the upcoming fiscal year to undertake construction and renovation works at several correctional facilities as well as improve the mobility of the Department of Correctional Services.Of the sum, $82 million will be spent at the Tower Street Adult Correctional Centre in Kingston for the construction of an external changing area utilising retrofitted containers, and a new block for the mentally ill.A sum of $26 million will go towards executing repairs to the inmate accommodation building at the St. Catherine Adult Correctional Centre.The remaining $60 million will be used to purchase three Coaster buses, one 15- seater bus, one pickup and two motorcycles.The project is being financed from the Consolidated Fund and will be implemented by the Ministry of National Security..last_img read more

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Nominations Sought For 2004 Woodlot Owner of the Year

first_img Each year, the Department of Natural Resources recognizes privatewoodlot owners for their outstanding stewardship and good woodlotmanagement. Nominations for Nova Scotia’s 2004 woodlot owner of the year arebeing accepted until Saturday, Jan. 31, at Department of NaturalResources offices or online atwww.gov.ns.ca/natr/extension/woya/applic.htm . Any resident of Nova Scotia who owns between 20 and 400 hectares(50 to 100 acres) of woodland, and who agrees to host a publiceducation and information field day on their woodlot, is eligiblefor the annual award. Natural Resources employees, regionalwinners from the last three years and provincial winners from thelast 10 years are not eligible. “This is an opportunity for Nova Scotians to acknowledge the manypositive activities that private woodlot owners are doing acrossthe province, by nominating someone they believe is deserving ofrecognition,” said Natural Resources Minister Richard Hurlburt.”Each year this prestigious award recognizes one woodlot ownerwho has put extra thought and care into managing his or herwoodlot sustainably.” Nominations are evaluated on a variety of criteria, such as thequality of harvesting practices, the environmental standardsbeing exercised and the owner’s efforts to improve the conditionand health of his or her woodlands. In addition to the recognition, the winning landowner alsoreceives a plaque, awarded by the minister, a large sign to postat the site and a major prize donated by a sponsoringmanufacturer. Past winners of the woodlot owner of the year awardinclude Richard Irving of Baxter’s Harbour, Kings Co.; Les Corkumof Falmouth, Hants Co.; Don and Katy Moore of Upper Kennetcook,Hants Co.; and Tom and Bill Skinner of South Berwick, Kings Co. Individuals and organizations are invited to submit nominationsfor the woodlot owner of the year to any office of the Departmentof Natural Resources. Nominations can also be sent directly toDale Glennie at the Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box698, Halifax, N.S., B3J 2T9, by fax to 902-424-7735 or by e-mailto woodlot@gov.ns.ca . The nomination must include the owner’s name, address, phonenumber, size and location of woodlot, a brief paragraph statingwhy this person deserves the nomination, and the nominator’s nameand phone number. NATURAL RESOURCES–Nominations Sought For 2004 Woodlot Owner ofthe Yearlast_img read more

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Help Avoid Bear Encounters

first_imgAfter hibernating through the long winter months, it is time for Nova Scotia’s black bears to be out and about, constantly looking for food. Storing garbage inside or in metal bear-proof containers and keeping your barbecue grill clean and grease-free are just some of the things that can prevent bear encounters at your home or cottage. “Bears have the potential to be dangerous and more than 500 nuisance bear situations were reported last year,” said Department of Natural Resources Minister David Morse. “Use caution when in an area where bears may be expected, and be sure to report all bear encounters.” While there is often an abundance of natural foods, bears are known to search for food from other sources, including rural backyards. Bears are attracted to garbage, compost, green bins, pet food and bird feeders. There are specific precautions home and cottage owners, campers and hikers should take to reduce the likelihood of attracting bears. To find out how to prevent bear incidents and what to do when seeing a black bear, visit the department website: www.gov.ns.ca/natr/wildlife/Nuisance/bears.htm . Bear sightings in communities and near homes should be reported to the Department of Natural Resources. Trained and experienced staff will determine the appropriate action. During business hours, call a local Natural Resources office. After hours, and on weekends and holidays, call toll free 1-800-565-2224.last_img read more

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Against the tide Thai floating temple defies coastal erosion

first_imgSamut Chin (Thailand): As sea waters slowly rose around this temple and his neighbours fled inland, Thai abbot Somnuek Atipanyo refused to budge and is today a symbol of the fight to restore the country’s fast-eroding coastlines. A dangerous combination of climate change, industrial farming and rapid urbanisation are endangering the Gulf of Thailand’s coasts, stripping away precious mangrove trees and leaving some buildings like Somnuek’s surrounded by sea water. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USIn the 30 years since the waters started encroaching, most of his neighbours in the fishing village of Samut Chin moved several hundred meters inland to rebuild their wooden homes. Standing in his saffron robes near his monastery on stilts — dubbed the “floating temple” — the 51-year-old monk points out to sea at the spot where the local school once stood. “This temple used to be in the middle of the village,” he tells AFP in Samut Chin, about an hour south of Bangkok. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”If we moved it, people wouldn’t even know there had ever been one here,” he says of the temple, accessible only by a small footbridge today. These shores were once protected by extensive mangrove forests — the Gulf of Thailand boasts some of the largest in the world — a natural defence against coastal erosion thanks to their extensive roots that stabilise the shoreline. But it’s a been a losing battle to preserve them. Mangrove forests have been cleared for extensive development of shrimp and salt farms, along with new houses and hotels that have popped up thanks to a development boom in recent decades. Thailand lost almost one third of its vast coastal mangrove forests between 1961 and 2000, according to a report from the nation’s Department of Marine and Coastal Resources and the UN Environment Programme. Climate change is also having an impact: stronger waves and more ferocious monsoons have wiped out mangroves in the Gulf of Thailand, which is especially vulnerable because its waters are so shallow. “The waves and tides are higher than before,” said Thanawat Jarupongsakul, who advises Thailand’s government on its policy to combat erosion. Asian and Caspian coastlines are the two areas in the world most affected by coastal erosion, according to a study published last year in the scientific journal Nature. It’s a global problem: tens of thousands of square kilometres of land have been lost from coastal erosion around the world — between 1984 and 2015 the equivalent of the surface area of Haiti was lost, the study said. In Thailand a quarter of the country’s shores — or about 700 kilometres (500 miles) — are eroding, some “severely”, according to data shared with AFP by the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources. Now there is a push to restore Thailand’s precious mangrove ecosystem through a national voluntary tree replanting scheme, including near Somnuek’s island monastery. On a recent sunny afternoon, scores of people spent the day wading chest-deep in the sea to replant mangrove trees. Clad in headscarves and hats, they gingerly reach down into the water to plant young saplings along lines of bamboo poles that help offer some protection against the waves. “This project is called ‘Planting a forest in people’s hearts,'” said Wason Ditsuwan, who runs the program. Set up in 2016 by Bangkok city authorities, the project has so far replanted 84 acres of mangroves across the country. Wason is hoping his project will succeed where others have failed. Nearly 10 years ago, government adviser Thanawat helped residents in Samut Chin replant mangrove trees but some areas were too far gone to recover. “Even if you plant a lot of mangroves, it cannot help,” he said. Another strategy is to drill pylons of cement into the seabed — and on the shoreline itself — to act as a substitute for the mangrove roots. This has proven successful so far in the tourist town of Pattaya further along the coast, where the pylons have helped to reclaim several metres of beach. But it’s a race to keep up with rapid development along the shore, Thanawat said. As for Somnuek’s stretch of coast, though further erosion has stopped for now, there is little hope his temple will ever see dry ground again. But the flooding has brought one unexpected advantage: dozens of tourists that flock to the so-called floating temple for Instagram-worthy selfies. “The fight against coastal erosion has brought fame,” village head Wisanu Kengsamut said.last_img read more

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UN chief commends Africas progress stresses need for accelerated growth

“Several African countries are among the world’s fastest growing economies, defying the global downturn. Opportunity beckons for ever greater numbers of people, and ever more international investors are taking notice,” Mr. Ban said yesterday evening in his remarks at the Africa Day celebrations in New York marking the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of African Unity, now known as the African Union (AU). The Day is traditionally observed on 25 May.“Of course, deep challenges persist. But Africa’s overall trajectory is clear. Africans are writing a new narrative in their history.”“Fifty years ago, the founders of the Organization of African Unity showed great resolve and collective purpose in leading the world against colonialism and apartheid,” Mr. Ban said. “Let us all show similar solidarity and conviction today in working to improve well-being and opportunity for all Africans.”Mr. Ban praised the declining poverty rates in the continent, as well as improvements in addressing deadly diseases. However, he noted that there are still areas where there is conflict, and the underlying causes need to be resolved to achieve lasting peace.“I know that Africans are determined to strengthen democracy, protect human rights, fight corruption and enhance governance,” he said.“The United Nations will continue to work with you to ensure the equitable distribution of resources, increase agricultural productivity, and tap the talents of Africa’s people, especially women and youth.”Mr. Ban, who was in Ethiopia last month to mark the AU’s 50th anniversary, emphasized the need to accelerate efforts to achieve the eight anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and ensure that Africa’s priorities and concerns are reflected in the post-2015 development agenda.“Achieving these objectives will require considerable effort and investment, and I continue to urge the international community and private sector to fully support this cause,” he added. read more

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UN human rights experts outline steps to strengthen prohibition prevention of torture

Torture victims undergo rehabilitation at the African Centre for the Prevention and Resolution of Conflicts, in Senegal. The centre is funded by the UN Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture. Credit: OHCHR “I encouraged Member States [of the UN] and human rights experts to consider the elaboration of a document […] which offers the best practices of interrogation of suspects as well as intervening witnesses and victims,” UN Special Rapporteur on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment Juan Mendez told journalists at the briefing. He added that such a document, based on the model of presumption of innocence and stressing that the objective of a criminal investigation be establishing truth based on evidence, would not only prevent torture but also other forms of coercion and mistreatment. Also at the briefing, the chair of the UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture, Malcolm Evans, drew particular attention to the fact that sites of torture are no longer just limited to “classical places” within the criminal justice system. “Such sites are now being found increasingly outside the system, for instance in the context of irregular migration or in low-level conflict,” he said. Mr. Evans also expressed concern at growing reprisals against persons who cooperate with independent human rights experts in the planning and execution of their visits to countries to monitor and report on the human rights situation, and called on countries to ensure that such individuals are not placed in peril. Both Mr. Mendez and Mr. Evans also expressed concern about the level of cooperation from countries, particularly in response to requests for invitation and in allowing complete and unhindered access to places of detention in the context of their respective mandates. Further today, the chair of the Committee against Torture Jens Modvig, highlighted steps taken by the Committee to become more effective and efficient and noted that the Committee has held numerous dialogues with States party to the Convention against Torture to strengthen the implementation of the Committee’s recommendations. Noting that there has been the implementation of the recommendations stand between 50 to 60 per cent, Mr. Modvig said: “We believe that this is a positive [indication], the ideal situation would be all State parties implementation all the recommendations.” He also reported that a number of African countries have initiated work to establish legal frameworks against torture and that these are showing an impact in addressing the prevalence of torture. “These efforts to strengthen […] the prevention and prohibition of torture, I believe that there are reasons for a certain amount of optimism although much needs to be done before the phenomenon of torture is finally eradicated,” he said. The three experts had earlier in the day held an interactive discussion with UN Member States at the General Assembly’s Third Committee where they discussed these and other related issues with the UN membership. The Committee against Torture is a body of independent human rights experts that monitors implementation of the Convention against Torture by its State parties. The subcommittee on prevention of torture (SPT), a body under the Convention’s Optional Protocol, has a preventive mandate that is focused on a sustained and proactive approach to the prevention of torture and ill-treatment. Independent experts and Special Rapporteurs are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work. read more

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A glimpse of life in the Earth Sciences field

The days were long, but coffee was aplenty — and so were the valuable lessons.The morning pick-me-up was more a necessity than a perk for the team of 20 Earth Sciences students who recently spent 10 days exploring the remote northern Ontario wilderness.A veteran of the term-ending expedition of the annual 3P99 Field Camp — Solid Earth course, Professor Frank Fueten knew the importance of sending his team out sufficiently fuelled.Each day, he cooked up a hearty breakfast for the group before they headed out for time in the field examining sedimentary and igneous rocks.Among the team members was Todd Robinson, a third-year Earth Sciences student who joined the experiential education adventure in hopes of applying the knowledge he learned in class.Every two days on the way back to their cabins, participating Earth Sciences students would break into groups to buy supplies for the next two days.“It was a great opportunity to see exactly what it’s like to be a field geologist dealing with all kinds of weather conditions and long days outside, trying to take in as much information as possible,” said the 22-year-old Welland native.Over the course of the trip, which ran from April 26 to May 5, the group travelled to Sudbury and spent time describing outcrops (large areas of rock sticking out of the ground) between Manitoulin Island and Elliot Lake, focusing on Espanola.Outside of travel time, seven days were spent in the field, mapping an area of about 17 kilometres along Highway 6.With much on the go — from mapping rocks and collecting data to producing maps and working on a final written — students often averaged 12-hour days, applying in-class knowledge to field work under the guidance of Fueten and Phil McCausland, Assistant Professor of Earth Sciences.“This trip took a lot of our class content and put it into an actual work environment,” said third-year Earth Sciences student Ariel Van Patter.“Every day in the field we got to be hands-on with the rocks,” said the 20-year-old Dorchester, Ont., native. “The outcrops were picked to show us different surface types and structures. The field work allowed us to put together all the information we knew and create a ‘story’ of geologic history.”Robinson learned a lot from the experience, taking away new knowledge about geology, how to perform field work and work with others.“You learn to train your eyes to see things that just looked like a broken rock before, but after, you are able to see what may have caused that to happen,” he said. “It’s almost like trying to decipher the past.”The educational value of the trip was twofold; along with applying in-class knowledge to real-life field examples, students also experienced cabin life and variable weather conditions. The experience shed light on life in the field — key information for aspiring earth scientists.Students had to adjust to temperatures ranging from zero to 20°C and experienced little to no running water in four of the seven allotted cabins, but made the most of the off-the-grid challenge nonetheless.One of Robinson’s favourite moments was the almost daily ‘polar bear dips’ he and several classmates took upon returning to camp.Ejaz Ahmed, Dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Science, said the course exemplifies the importance Brock places on providing experiential learning opportunities.“It is no surprise that the program has enjoyed a more than two-decade-long run. Hands-on work in the field with leading experts provides our students with a competitive edge,” he said. “They are able to take knowledge they learned in a classroom setting and apply it directly in an environment that simulates what they will find in future careers.”For Robinson, the trip turned out to be everything he expected and more.“I had a great time learning to look at the outcrops and making my own observations. The experience really brought home the fact that I had chosen the right program for myself at Brock,” he said.“I wanted a science-based program that involved going outside and getting your hands dirty to acquire the information you need. That’s exactly what I got.” read more

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Third book of Hilary Mantels Wolf Hall trilogy will finally be published

Mark Rylance plays Thomas Cromwell in the BBC adaptation Hilary Mantel wins the Booker Prize in 2012 While Wolf Hall opened with a 15-year-old Cromwell lying on the ground in a pool of his own blood, willing himself to “get up” after being beaten by his father, Mirror and the Light will end in similar fashion with his death, she disclosed. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The final novel in Hilary Mantel’s Cromwell trilogy is to be published in March 2020, it has been announced, as she admits the long-awaited book has been the “greatest challenge of my writing life”. Fans have been clamouring for the book, called The Mirror and the Light, since the second installation was published in 2012, with Mantel regularly facing questions from readers about why it was taking so long. Her publishers, 4th Estate, have today confirmed it will be out in the UK on March 5th next year, after a stealth marketing campaign which saw a heavy clue featuring the Wolf Hall Tudor rose emblem being placed on a billboard in Leicester Square. Bookies William Hill are already offering odds of 5/1 on Mantel winning a third Booker Prize, after the success of Wolf Hall in 2009 and Bring Up the Bodies in 2012. The trilogy tells the true story of Thomas Cromwell’s rise to prominence in the court of Henry VIII, and will conclude with his fall from grace and execution.  “His consciousness recedes and ebbs away,” Mantel said then. “And we will be back at the beginning.”We will be back with a man on the ground in his own blood, saying to himself ‘get up, get up”.”Nicholas Pearson, publishing director at 4th Estate, said today: “Readers around the world have relished this experience in the years since, both with that novel and its successor, Bring Up the Bodies. The Mirror & the Light is every bit as daring and thrilling as the novels which precede it.”Completely immersive, as it charts the final years of Cromwell, it also casts a fresh light on the politics of power and the way we live now.” Sales of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies have reached over 5 million so far, with the novels each translated into more than 30 languages. Wolf Hall has also been adapted into a Royal Shakespeare Company play and acclaimed BBC television series. A spokesman said the television production team is “standing by and eager to return” to recreate the third novel for the screen.  “I didn’t know at first I would write a trilogy, but gradually I realised the richness and fascination of this extraordinary life.”Since then I have been on a long journey, with the good companionship of archivists, artists, booksellers, librarians, actors, producers, and – most importantly – millions of readers through the world.”I hope they will stay with me as we walk the last miles of Cromwell’s life, ascending to unprecedented riches and honour and abruptly descending to the scaffold at Tower Hill. Mark Rylance plays Thomas Cromwell in the BBC adaptation The first two novels both won the Booker Prize Mantel said: “When I began work on my Thomas Cromwell books back in 2005, I had high hopes, but it took time to feel out the full scope of the material. Erm… grabbing lunch and saw this in Leicester Sq! That rose. That line. Oh my god is the new Hilary Mantel finally coming?!?! pic.twitter.com/5tytsBqQg7— Waterstones Piccadilly (@WaterstonesPicc) May 21, 2019 Hilary Mantel wins the Booker Prize in 2012 “This book has been the greatest challenge of my writing life, and the most rewarding; I hope and trust my readers will find it has been worth the wait.”Bill Hamilton, Mantel’s literary agent added: “It is hugely exciting to see Hilary’s masterwork, written over 14 years, brought to its triumphant conclusion. This is a great literary landmark.”Publishers described The Mirror and the Light as the “triumphant close” to the Wolf Hall trilogy, which has so far been praised by critics for its distinctive style and remarkable attention to historic detail. In 2013, Mantel told an audience at the Oxford Literature Festival that her third book would open with Cromwell at the scaffold after the execution of Anne Boleyn, beginning with the words: “Once the Queen has been five minutes dead he walks away.” The first two novels both won the Booker Prize read more

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7 intense feelings Irish people have about America

first_img‘MURICA!With today being 4 July, there’s no better time to reflect on the almost sibling-like relationship between Ireland and the USA.Here’s a breakdown of the complex feelings Irish people have about America, which straddles the line between love and…not-love.AdmirationYou’re from Texas/New York/California? *eyes get big* What’s it REALLY like over there? Source: GiphyI hear they have supermarkets that are so big you’d get LOST in them.JealousyAnyone who went to America on holidays came back with a rake of cool stuff, like Abercrombie hoodies (before its Dublin invasion), Guess handbags and the infamous US sweets. Where’s our cool stuff?AnnoyanceMostly directed at US tourists. Source: Sam Boal/Photocall IrelandWhy do they walk so slow on the busiest street in the country? Why are they wearing socks and sandals? Why are they taking pictures of everything?It’s just a pub, GOD. Source: GiphyAngerThe next American to regale us with a tale about their grandmother’s uncle’s dog that came over on the boat from Ireland back in the day is GETTING IT. Source: GurlCamaraderieBut isn’t it lovely that they value their Irish heritage, all the same? They LIKE us. Source: Photocall Ireland(We can never get our stories straight here.)Fear Good GOD *crosses self*Sure there’s all sorts of stuff going on over there. Murders and killings and what not.Standard response to any particularly shocking bit of US news: “Only in America. *shakes head*”AweFAMOUS AMERICAN PEOPLE. IN IRELAND. We’ll never get over the novelty. Source: AP/Press Association ImagesBarack Obama! He’s HERE and drinking Guinness and everything! Wow.Mass panic as UK branch of Nando’s runs out of chicken>Transformers star Jack Reynor answers the most important Irish questions>last_img read more

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1552 killed in road crashes in 4 months NCPSRR

first_imgroad accident_237At least 1,552 people were killed in road accidents across Bangladesh between January and April this year, reports UNB.As many as 1,495 accidents on various highways, national, inter-district and regional roads left 3,039 others injured, said the National Committee to Protect Shipping, Roads and Railways (NCPSRR), a non-government organisation, on Saturday.The victims included 195 women and 268 children.NCPSRR prepared the report based on 22 national dailies, 10 regional newspapers and eight online news portals and news agencies.According to the report, 411 people, including 53 women and 71 children, lost lives and 725 others injured in 383 accidents in January.Some 401 accidents occurred in February where 415 people were killed and 884 others injured. Among the deceased, 58 were women and 62 children.In March, 386 people, including 46 women and 82 children, were killed and 820 others injured in 384 road crashes.Some 327 accidents occurred in April killing 340 people and injuring 610 others. Among the deceased, 38 were women and 53 children.NCPSRR general secretary Ashis Kumar Dey told UNB that they identified 10 major reasons for an increase in road accidents.They include – racing tendency among drivers and reckless driving; contractual leasing of vehicles on daily basis; employing drivers without licenses; lack of awareness of pedestrians and small vehicle drivers, especially motorcyclists; overloading; and overtaking tendency of drivers violating traffic rules.Besides, driving without any break, plying of unfit vehicles, violation of traffic rules on long routes, increase of motorcycles and three-wheelers on roads and highways, and carrying passengers and goods in locally-made motorised vehicles also lead to accidents, he added.last_img read more

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Book Review Super Mario How Nintendo Conquered America

first_imgIf you look at the state of the video games industry today you will se a few key companies clamouring to keep up with the ever changing demands of gamers. One of those companies that not only keeps up, but predicts what will work next is Nintendo.Over the years it has set the pace in the video game space, managing to introduce and dominate the portable gaming arena, as well as raking in billions with the NES and SNES. More recently it went off on a strange tangent giving us the dual-screen DS and the motion-controlled Wii. Both products were risky, but both paid off and earned the Japanese company billions more.While on the face of it Nintendo looks to have had all the luck, the underlying story of its history in the U.S. is anything but lucky. Nintendo’s position in the video games industry today has made been through the clever decisions and designs of a handful of key people coupled with the company’s most lucrative and popular of game characters: Mario.Jeff Ryan has attempted to offer us a brief 304-page summary of Nintendo’s history in a Western market, and it’s a fascinating read. While much of the information may be known to those who have read other gaming history books, in Super Mario: How Nintendo Conquered America, it is all brought together and more detail added to give you a full timeline of events.Ryan shows us that from the start Nintendo was a company not averse to trying things a different way. When 2000 expensive Radar Scope arcade cabinets failed to sell, they weren’t dumped, instead a new game was painstakingly loaded on to them and sent out to arcades as something a little different. That game was Donkey Kong and the first project by an up-and-coming 29-year-old designer named Shigeru Miyamoto.Such a story sets the tone and takes us on a trip of King Kong lawsuits, a light gun concept created during a meeting about solar cells, how nobody wanted the NES in the U.S., and how Nintendo cleverly managed to achieve an 85% market share through its controlling nature and a magazine that mostly acted as one giant advertisement for Nintendo’s games and machines every month.You’ll also learn how Sega managed to go from an also-ran to a major competitor, how a real-time demo led to 20+ years of Mario voice acting for Charles Martinet, and the games Nintendo would rather forget featuring Mario and Zelda on non-Nintendo hardware platforms.If nothing else this book reinforces how the key people at Nintendo: Shigeru Miyamoto, Gunpei Yokoi, Hiroshi Yamauchi, Minou Arakawa, Koji Kondo, and Howard Lincoln made the company a success by bringing to the table design, music, hardware, business, and legal innovation. But at the same time, it’s the Mario games that are just as important, managing to sell systems as well as millions of copies themselves.If you have any interest in Nintendo, then this is certainly a book to add to your colelction. It’s certainly no Masters of Doom, but an interesting read and history lesson nonetheless. And following reading it I’ll guarantee your first desire will be to pick up a Mario game and start playing.(The copy of Super Mario: How Nintendo Conquered America used in this review was provided courtesy of Penguin)last_img read more

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IRL Scientist on Doctor Who Its So Easy to Get the Science

first_img HBO Max Scores Exclusive ‘Doctor Who’ Streaming RightsJo Tro Do Plo Plo No: ‘Doctor Who’ Welcomes Back Familiar Monster Most annoying thing is you could have made story work with realistic mistakes, without the HUGE level of incompetence #Karl4DWScienceFixer— Karl Byrne (@KJCByrne) May 28, 2017Last week’s “The Pyramid at the End of the World” (midway point in Steven Moffat’s three-part story arc) is especially guilty of throwing protocol out the window.The episode hinges on human error—or, even worse, scientist error: Erica broke her reading glasses and Douglas is in a hungover stupor, ensuring neither is in tip-top shape to work in a biochemical research lab today.“You look, and don’t take this the wrong way—you look awful,” Erica tells her Agrofuel Research Operations colleague, who admits to a night of debauchery.“There was drinking. There were breakages,” he says, before drowsily suggesting they move to “stage two” of their work.“Well, it would be rude not to,” Erica says brightly. “You OK mixing it? Broke my reading glasses.”No, Erica, he’s not OK doing anything in this state but drinking gallons of water and having a lie down.Douglas (Tony Gardner) does not follow laboratory protocol (via BBC)Instead, bleary-eyed Douglas goes ahead with the task, unsurprisingly misplacing a decimal point (11.89 becomes 118.9) to accidentally create a super-bacteria, which later (rightfully) turns him into a pile of mush.Co-written by showrunner Moffat and Peter Harness (“Kill the Moon,” “The Zygon Invasion,” “The Zygon Inversion”), the episode raises so many questions.Why are there only two people working with this volatile material? Shouldn’t someone double check the inputs before pressing enter? How did Douglas—who’s stupid enough to get drunk on a weeknight then grab a cupful of obviously toxic material secured only by his hand—land this job in the first place?I studied journalism in college, and even I know that’s not how biochemical research labs operate.“It’s so easy to get the science right,” Dr. Pam Cameron, director of Scottish outreach firm NovoScience, told Geek.Boasting more than two decades of practical science experience, the former biomedical scientist in an email highlighted at least half a dozen blunders in the season’s seventh episode.“Surely a microbe capable of ‘killing off root systems’ would be handled in a containment level three or four lab,” she wrote.The airlock doors (built into an existing lab on location at Swansea University), indicate negative pressure. “Yet those would not open directly into an office,” Cameron explained. “They would open into an [anteroom], where scientists would take off outer hazmat suits or shower completely and re-dress for containment level 4.”And that’s not even the half of it.Is the suit Erica (Rachel Denning) wears really necessary? (via BBC)“What was the point of the ‘space suits’?” she asked, highlighting the lab rats’ all-white ensembles, which contain no independent oxygen supply, and can be removed on a whim. “What’s the point of wearing this?”Frankly, there is none. Except, perhaps, for Moffat and Harness to create the illusion of what they envisage as a working laboratory—complete with an air filtration system that cycles toxins out of the air every 30 minutes.“Very good,” Cameron said, “but this would NOT be vented into the atmosphere.”Running one of the most popular shows on television is a tough task, and it’s nearly impossible to please everyone. But surely Moffat & Co. could have put a few more minutes of thought and preparation into this episode.“Why not create the bacterium as being capable of mind control, forcing one of the scientists to release it? That’s not inconceivable,” Cameron suggested. “A good sci-fi writer could have dreamed that up or [consult] with a scientist to see what was possible.“It would have been so easy to depict this correctly and it would have made for more interesting viewing than the quick rush to the end, narrowly preventing destruction of the Earth,” she wrote.Read our full recap of “The Pyramid at the End of the World,” and watch tonight’s installment, “The Lie of the Land” (9 p.m. Eastern on BBC America), to find out whether this was all just a poor simulation by the Monks, or if the BBC should hire a real scientist to review its Doctor Who scripts. Doctor Who does a lot of things well. But understanding the physical or material world through observation and experimentation is not one of them.For more than 50 years, the popular sci-fi show has put the emphasis on fiction rather than science—an oversight that often leaves viewers miffed. Stay on target Yep! Seriously annoyed by the lab set up in #DoctorWho – so much so that I couldn’t focus on the episode through the rage! @bbcdoctorwho https://t.co/tHyLrrXpCX— Dr Suze Kundu (@FunSizeSuze) May 28, 2017last_img read more

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